The American Morality Trap, Part One

독도는우리땅

This article is part one of The American Morality Trap. It is for an American audience. If you’re Korean, I’d ask you click here and read the Korean Morality Trap first. If you count yourself a member of neither tribe, read in whichever order you please.

South Korea is a menace. We don’t really understand this because we’re too busy worrying about the scourge of terrorism in the Middle East, but the crazed hyper-nationalists in Korea care so much about their stupid historical grudge match with Japan that they won’t be happy until they’ve either drug us into another world war or turned the entire region over to the control of Chinese communists. You’d think that, after America rescued these people from communists in the Korean War, from the Japanese in World War II and from themselves during their long love affair with military dictators, they’d learn.

Well, they haven’t. Even with China trying to annex the oceans and spreading communism throughout the region, hell, even with China supporting the nuclear morons in North Korea, the South Koreans are too busy fighting with Japan to do anything logical to counter the communist threat. Are they cooperating with the other rich, Asian democracy in Japan to counter the rising communist threat? Not even a little bit. Are they welcoming new American forces onto the peninsula to counter the rising threat? Quite the opposite.

The really sad part? It’s all because the Koreans and Japanese are fighting over a stupid rock called Dokdo, which is about the size of a supermarket. Hmm, a supermarket sized rock on one hand, avoiding a communist menace on the other. Which would a reasonable (and by reasonable I mean “not Korean”) person think?

Remember this when some politician tells you to “trust our friends in Korea.” These lunatics are so insular, so crazed with insignificant historical nothingness and so sure we’ll come rescue them again that they’re willing to let communism and war come rather than get over their bruised feelings from 70 years ago.

How do you feel right now? Please take a moment and really think about the answer to that question. Are you angry? Are you afraid? How do you feel about me? How do you feel about your neighbors? When you’ve figured your own reaction out, please click here for part three

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