The Blackguard – My Novel in Ten Sentences

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My first published novel, The Blackguard, is about 60,000 words long. I’m going to try and explain it in ten sentences.

Props to Diotima’s Ladder for this idea.

The Blackguard is about oppressed minorities getting run over by the march of modernity, except here those minorities are white supremacists who practice Chinese-style foot-binding, East African-style scarification and Native American-style warrior shamanism.

The Blackguard is the forces of imperialism, represented by a young engineer with no use for “slave morality” and a willingness to trade happiness for glory.

The Blackguard is the bright side of losing your heritage.

The Blackguard is the dark side of losing your heritage.

The Blackguard is trying to bring the ubermensch into the world, succeeding and then really wishing you hadn’t.

The Blackguard is race treason as heroism, pity as disgrace and rebellion as the only means of escape.

The Blackguard is wondering if bad intentions matter when they lead to good consequences.

The Blackguard is deciding whether your identity is something you’ve chosen or something that fell on you when you were born.

The Blackguard is overcoming the heat of revenge with the chill of calculation.

The Blackguard is the triumph of the things we make ourselves over the things we’re made from.

If you’d like to give The Blackguard a try, please click here

2 comments

  1. Shooter · · Reply

    So…what happens if Al Sharpton was on Horatio Nelson’s ship, reading lines from ’12 Years a Slave’ and simultaneously calling for the Confederate flag to be banned…all across different timelines!

    And why, exactly, are white supremacists practicing other cultures’ methods of torture, when, as white supremacists, they should focus on their own torture, their own kind, and their own country?

    Plot holes. You have them. One thing I notice about writers like this is that when you can’t come up with something original, lay on the snark. Works when you look like Joss Whedon.

    Surprised the ‘Blackguard’ isn’t about a bunch of Xhosa Africans fighting Zulus. But that implies that they can swim, build boats, and work.

    1. “So…what happens if Al Sharpton was on Horatio Nelson’s ship, reading lines from ’12 Years a Slave’ and simultaneously calling for the Confederate flag to be banned…all across different timelines!”

      I don’t know, but it sounds like a great opportunity for angry Republican screed.

      “And why, exactly, are white supremacists practicing other cultures’ methods of torture, when, as white supremacists, they should focus on their own torture, their own kind, and their own country?”

      Surely you already know and are simply testing me, but I hasten to mention that scarification is an initiation rite, foot binding was a beautification measure and warrior shamanism is a type social organization. Or, in other words, not torture.

      As for why the white supremacists practice these things, I’m sure an expert on the book like you already knows. However, just in case it slipped your mind, I’d refer you to the chapter and a half wherein the forefathers discuss how America, and the Anglo-sphere more generally, really sucks at preserving its own blood. As you know, the white supremacists are focused on racial purity, not cultural purity. As such, it’s natural they look to the outside when seeking to lock their people into the town.

      A historian of your caliber certainly knows this already, but the success of the Anglo-sphere over the last 500 years has been founded almost entirely on an inability to maintain racial purity. Thoughtful white supremacists deriving from English stock, like the ones in my book, would thus find little of use in their own histories.

      “Plot holes. You have them.”

      Plot holes? Hmm. Are you talking about the relationship between Marcus and Zitkala-sa? Perhaps you didn’t buy Ruth’s dialog on benevolence? Ah, I got it, you weren’t happy with the implication that the baby was exactly the ubermenschen the towns people claimed they wanted to bring into the world.

      You did, of course, read the book. Right?

      “One thing I notice about writers like this is that when you can’t come up with something original, lay on the snark. Works when you look like Joss Whedon.”

      I’m sure there’s something profound here, hidden under the surface of such apparent stupidity. Please, help me unearth the wisdom.

      “Surprised the ‘Blackguard’ isn’t about a bunch of Xhosa Africans fighting Zulus. But that implies that they can swim, build boats, and work.”

      I find myself very much chastened. It’s clear I’m failing in my efforts to penetrate the stridently-ignorant-assholes market. My apologies that I could not serve your demographic better.

      Sincerely,
      Ben

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